Far Eastern Curlew Wading In A Stream In Siberia 3

Far Eastern Curlew Wading In A Stream In Siberia 3 – This is part 3 of a continuing series documenting the development of my gouache painting of a landscape in Siberia. In the last post I made improvements to the fir trees on the mountains. In this post I make improvements to the blades of grass in the foreground, background and middle distance. Also, each Far Eastern Curlew wading in the stream has been finished as well as their reflections in the water. When painting the birds, I used a series of short handle, white sable, Robert Simmons brushes then finish with a pair of Windsor & Newton Regency Gold brushes. For the initial outline, I used the short handle, white sable Robert Simmons #2, round. I then fill in the block color with the short handle, white sable Robert Simmons 1/2 oval wash. For I gradate the highlight color with a short handle, white sable Robert Simmons #3 round. After that, I paint the feathers, eyes and beak using two Windsor & Newton Regency Gold brushes, a #1 540 round and a #2 520 round. The #1 540 is used only for the finest detail. I find that for painting fine details, the Windsor & Newton Regency Gold #1 540 and #2 520 are outstanding brushes. They use a gold taklon sable and have nickel plated ferrules. They are outstanding brushes if you draw with your brush. I used them 20 years ago when I was painting only with acrylic. I’ve since switched to gouache but I still use them because they are great for artists who like to draw with a brush. I mention this because major art retailers do not carry the Windsor & Newton Regency Gold series brushes. Not really sure why. You can buy them on Amazon no problem. Anyone interested in Pen & Ink can check out my ink drawing blog.

Far Eastern Curlew Wading In A Stream In Siberia 3

Far Eastern Curlew Wading In A Stream In Siberia 2

Far Eastern Curlew Wading In A Stream In Siberia 2 – This is part 2 of a continuing series documenting the development of my gouache painting of a Far Eastern Curlew bird and a landscape in Siberia. The trees on the mountains in the background were not painted properly in the first post.
In this post I’ll document the improvement and explain how I do some things. The trees originally did not look right. The trees which were spruce trees, were sparse and just did not look proper. To make the correction, I first painted over the old trees by mixing a blue color that matches the background. Next I begin drawing the outline of each individual tree. On the left is a detailed close up and on the right are the beginning of the new trees with the entire painting as a whole. I want to make sure that the my new technique is working so I finish the lower left portion of the mountain to make sure that I am satisfied before wasting time doing the whole mountain just to realize that it still doesn’t look right. Once I am satisfied, I proceed to apply the same technique that was done in the lower left hand corner of the mountain to the entire mountain.

Because I like to draw with a brush , I mix my gouache paint with a lot of water. To save money and time, I use a piece of glass for my palette with a sheet of white paper underneath. I like mixing my paint on glass because glass is hard and smooth which is the type of surface you need if you are going to mix your colors with a lot of water. Also, glass will never wear out. I have several sheets of glass with a different set of colors on each one. Pictured left is my mountain colors palette. On this particular sheet of glass I have my mountain background blue color, my spruce tree outline and shape color and my spruce tree highlight green. Using a liner brush, I apply the highlight green color to the outline of each tree on the mountain. Compared to the first post, the trees on this mountain are a big improvement. It was worth the time and effort to mix more paint to paint over everything and do all over again. You’ll notice in the photos that show my brush technique, there is always a piece of paper underneath my hand. That is to prevent the oils that are present in skin from coming in contact with the painting. The final thumbnail on the right shows the finished spruce trees on the mountain. In the next post, we’ll work on the grass in the meadow.

Far Eastern Curlew Wading In A Stream in Siberia 2

Far Eastern Curlew Wading In A Stream In Siberia 2