Painting a tree and grass on my cormorant painting

Painting a tree and grass on my cormorant painting – I added a tree and some grass to my gouache cormorant painting. Using warm yellows for sunlight and cool blues and black for the shadows, I tried to give the appearance of trees and grass in the early morning sunlight. The sun is rising on the right side of the painting therefore the light is on the right side of the trees and grass and the shadows (blues) are on the left. When I paint the grass I use a dark gray or black base coat. From there I add a green with very little white or yellow mixed with it. The green goes on top of the gray/black base coat. Then I add the highlights which is a pale yellow with Permanent White mixed with it. Please watch the video to see how I paint grass using a liner brush with the colors mentioned.

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Art Prints of Wood Stork and Water Lilies For Sale

Gouache Painting - Wood Stork and Water Lilies - Prints of this painting are for sale on my store at Fine Art America.
Gouache Painting – Wood Stork and Water Lilies – Prints of this painting are for sale on my store at Fine Art America. And yes, you can buy a king size bed sheet and shower curtain with this image on it on my store.

Art Prints of Gouache Painting Wood Stork and Water Lilies For Sale – A few months ago, I was able to finish my wood stork and water lilies painting. It is now available for prints on both of my Print on Demand stores. A busy schedule has prevented me from making a blog post announcing the latest arrivals to my online stores. Art Prints of Wood Stork and Water Lilies are now available on Fine Art America. You can also buy them at Saatchi Art.

Print On Demand

Wood Stork and Water Lilies - Art Print - Here is an example of my gouache painting on a pillow. Artwork can be printed on other items such as shower curtains, beach towels and bed sheets.
Wood Stork and Water Lilies – Art Print – Here is an example of my gouache painting on a pillow. Artwork can be printed on other items such as shower curtains, beach towels and bed sheets.

Why do I have two print on demand stores? Fine Art America is well established in the USA. Saatchi is well known in the UK and Europe in general. Saatchi concentrates on selling fine art prints using quality papers and original art. Fine Art America offers that too. But they also allow people to buy other stuff like bedsheets, shower curtains, beach towels, pillows and much more, with your favorite artwork on it.

Painting The Wood Stork In The Morning Light

Wood Stork in the Morning Light - Here is a progress photo showing the yellows and oranges of the morning light.
Wood Stork in the Morning Light – Here is a progress photo showing the yellows and oranges of the morning light.

Painting The Wood Stork In The Morning Light – I made several mistakes in the past few months while painting the wood stork. The original pencil drawing was not correctly drawn. I embossed a carbon copy of the original drawing onto the finished background. Then, I painted a white base coat onto the embossed drawing of the wood stork. It was after I added the white base coat that I could see that the wood stork was not accurately drawn. The bird I had drawn looked more like a seagull than a wood stork. Repainted the background, then correctly drew another wood stork. Carbon copied it down on the new background and painted another white base coat. I added the shadow colors and the highlight colors. The shadow colors comprised of white, cyan with a little bit of black and red making it a light blueish violet. The light consisted of yellow and white and another color which was a yellowy orange.

Images Showing The Progression

Wood Stork in the Morning Light - The embossed pencil lines on top of the cypress tree landscape.
Wood Stork in the Morning Light – The embossed pencil lines on top of the cypress tree landscape.
Wood Stork in the Morning Light - A white base coat for the wood stork. Unfortunately, the stork in this shot is drawn incorrectly.
Wood Stork in the Morning Light – A white base coat for the wood stork. Unfortunately, the stork in this shot is drawn incorrectly.
Here the shape and outline of the wood stork has been corrected.
Wood Stork in the Morning Light – Here the shape and outline of the wood stork has been corrected.
Wood stork with the proper shadow color.
Wood Stork in the Morning Light – Wood stork with the proper shadow color.
Wood stork with the proper shadow and light colors on the feathers.
Wood Stork in the Morning Light – Wood stork with the proper shadow and light colors on the feathers.

Painting Cypress Trees and Lily Pads

Painting the lily pads with my liner.
Painting the lily pads with my liner.

Painting Cypress Trees and Lily Pads – Today I will try to complete the last of the Cypress trees and begin the lily pads. For the last Cypress tree which is in the foreground I’ll be adding the grooves in the bark. Using a somewhat hard pencil like a 2H, I draw the grooves on the tree. (see photo below) Using a liner, I paint over the pencil lines using a custom mixed dark brown like a Burnt Umber mixed with Jet Black. I have a pre-mixed palette of tree bark colors from the other Cypress trees that were painted so I’ll be using those colors for tree color consistency.

Now that the Cypress trees have been finished, it’s time to add the lily pads to the lake. To do that, I take the tracing paper hinged at the top of the painting that has a tracing of the original drawing on it, flip it over and ‘carbon’ the portion of the drawing that has the lily pads (see pics). Once the portion of the drawing with the lily pads has been ‘carboned’ on the back, I flip the tracing paper back over onto the painting and re-draw over the drawing which transfers a drawing of the lily pads onto the lake (see pic). With pencil lines now impressed upon the painting, I take my liner with some watered down Permanent White gouache paint and begin drawing over the lines with the brush. Once this process is complete, I take my Robert Simmons 785 Series #4 White Sable brush and begin filling all of the ovals. Once that is complete, I repeat the process using a custom mixed green. The Permanent White undercoat really helps to give the green a lot of brightness and contrast on the black water.

Here is our last Cypress tree to paint before we put the finishing touches on it. Notice the pencil lines.
Here is our last Cypress tree to paint before we put the finishing touches on it. Notice the pencil lines.
This is the lake before we add the final reflections in the water and add the lily pads.
This is the lake before we add the final reflections in the water and add the lily pads.
The largest Cypress tree in the painting is almost complete.
The largest Cypress tree in the painting is almost complete.
To transfer a drawing of the lily pads to the lake, we take a tracing of the original drawing, we 'carbon' the back of it using a soft 5B pencil.
To transfer a drawing of the lily pads to the lake, we take a tracing of the original drawing, we ‘carbon’ the back of it using a soft 5B pencil.
This is a tracing of our original drawing hinged at the top of our painting, flipped over. You can see carboned portions of the tracing paper of the painting that is now complete.
This is a tracing of our original drawing hinged at the top of our painting, flipped over. You can see carboned portions of the tracing paper of the painting that is now complete.
Adding the lily pads. To accomplish this we have to paint a base coat of gouache Permanent White to make the lily pad green color really stand out.
Adding the lily pads. To accomplish this we have to paint a base coat of gouache Permanent White to make the lily pad green color really stand out.
The trees in the background now have reflections in the water.
The trees in the background now have reflections in the water.
Look closely at the water and you can now see that the drawing of the lily pads has been transferred to the painting.
Look closely at the water and you can now see that the drawing of the lily pads has been transferred to the painting.
My Robert Simmons 785 Series #4 White Sable and my Robert Simmons E51 Series #2 Liner.
My Robert Simmons 785 Series #4 White Sable and my Robert Simmons E51 Series #2 Liner.
Painting the base white coat of the lily pads with my liner.
Painting the base white coat of the lily pads with my liner.
Painting the outline with my Robert Simmon E51 Series #2 Liner. Afterwards I fill with a white base coat of the lily pads with my Robert Simmons 785 Series #4 White Sable.
Painting the outline with my Robert Simmon E51 Series #2 Liner. Afterwards I fill with a white base coat of the lily pads with my Robert Simmons 785 Series #4 White Sable.
Now that all of the lily pads have an opaque white fill using Windsor & Newton Permanent White, we'll paint them green knowing the green will look really vibrant with that white base coat underneath.
Now that all of the lily pads have an opaque white fill using Windsor & Newton Permanent White, we’ll paint them green knowing the green will look really vibrant with that white base coat underneath.

Painting Shadows on the Cypress Trees

Using my #1 series 540 Windsor & Newton Regency Gold to paint the sky blue highlights in the shadow.
Using my #1 series 540 Windsor & Newton Regency Gold to paint the sky blue highlights in the shadow.

Painting Shadows on the Cypress Trees – Last time, we painted the bark on the Cypress trees that are in sunlight. Now we will paint the side of the trees that are in shadow. Although they are in shadow, there is still the opportunity to show lots of color by creating a warm/cool bias between the side of the tree in shadow with the side that is in sunlight. Back in the “old days”, before computers and color photography, artwork was photographed with black and white film. Having a strong warm and cool colors was advantageous because they would help provide contrast when being photographed with black and white film.

For the shadows on Cypress trees I am painting, I use four different shades of bark color. The basic recipe for my bark shadow color is Windsor & Newton Gouache Cyan Blue, Sepia, Ochre, Jet Black and Permanent White. The lighter of the colors have no Jet Black, more Sepia, more Ochre, more Permanent White and less Cyan Blue. More Sepia, Ochre and less Cyan Blue makes for a warmer lighter color. The darker shadow colors are just the opposite. More Cyan Blue, more Jet Black and less Permanent White, Ochre and Sepia. The complete the shadow colors I take a thin liner and add a highlight made up of the color of the sky, a mixture of Cyan Blue and Permanent White. This gives the shadow color a colorful realistic look (see top photo). If an object is not in direct sunlight, the shadow will still have color. It will reflect colors from the sky. Anyone who has taken lots of night photography in the city has knows this. A good digital camera picks up colors that the naked eye doesn’t see. Objects that aren’t in direct light still have lots of color. The colors are just much cooler with lots of blue.

This is where we left off. The two trees to the left and right of the big tree are the ones we will be working on.
This is where we left off. The two trees to the left and right of the big tree are the ones we will be working on.
Here is our glass palette of tree bark colors.
Here is our glass palette of tree bark colors.
Here is the palette of water reflection colors. I will recycle one of the blues for the highlight shadow color.
Here is the palette of water reflection colors. I will recycle one of the blues for the highlight shadow color.
This is one of my thinnest liners. The #1 series 540 Windsor & Newton Regency Gold. I was using this in the top photo.
This is one of my thinnest liners. The #1 series 540 Windsor & Newton Regency Gold. I was using this in the top photo.
This is the painting after working on the shadow side of the trees.
This is the painting after working on the shadow side of the trees.
A detailed closeup of the tree on the left.
A detailed closeup of the tree on the left.
A detailed closeup of the tree on the right.
A detailed closeup of the tree on the right.