Painting The Wood Stork In The Morning Light

Wood Stork in the Morning Light - Here is a progress photo showing the yellows and oranges of the morning light.
Wood Stork in the Morning Light – Here is a progress photo showing the yellows and oranges of the morning light.

Painting The Wood Stork In The Morning Light – I made several mistakes in the past few months while painting the wood stork. The original pencil drawing was not correctly drawn. I embossed a carbon copy of the original drawing onto the finished background. Then, I painted a white base coat onto the embossed drawing of the wood stork. It was after I added the white base coat that I could see that the wood stork was not accurately drawn. The bird I had drawn looked more like a seagull than a wood stork. Repainted the background, then correctly drew another wood stork. Carbon copied it down on the new background and painted another white base coat. I added the shadow colors and the highlight colors. The shadow colors comprised of white, cyan with a little bit of black and red making it a light blueish violet. The light consisted of yellow and white and another color which was a yellowy orange.

Images Showing The Progression

Wood Stork in the Morning Light - The embossed pencil lines on top of the cypress tree landscape.
Wood Stork in the Morning Light – The embossed pencil lines on top of the cypress tree landscape.
Wood Stork in the Morning Light - A white base coat for the wood stork. Unfortunately, the stork in this shot is drawn incorrectly.
Wood Stork in the Morning Light – A white base coat for the wood stork. Unfortunately, the stork in this shot is drawn incorrectly.
Here the shape and outline of the wood stork has been corrected.
Wood Stork in the Morning Light – Here the shape and outline of the wood stork has been corrected.
Wood stork with the proper shadow color.
Wood Stork in the Morning Light – Wood stork with the proper shadow color.
Wood stork with the proper shadow and light colors on the feathers.
Wood Stork in the Morning Light – Wood stork with the proper shadow and light colors on the feathers.

Painting Shadows on the Cypress Trees

Using my #1 series 540 Windsor & Newton Regency Gold to paint the sky blue highlights in the shadow.
Using my #1 series 540 Windsor & Newton Regency Gold to paint the sky blue highlights in the shadow.

Painting Shadows on the Cypress Trees – Last time, we painted the bark on the Cypress trees that are in sunlight. Now we will paint the side of the trees that are in shadow. Although they are in shadow, there is still the opportunity to show lots of color by creating a warm/cool bias between the side of the tree in shadow with the side that is in sunlight. Back in the “old days”, before computers and color photography, artwork was photographed with black and white film. Having a strong warm and cool colors was advantageous because they would help provide contrast when being photographed with black and white film.

For the shadows on Cypress trees I am painting, I use four different shades of bark color. The basic recipe for my bark shadow color is Windsor & Newton Gouache Cyan Blue, Sepia, Ochre, Jet Black and Permanent White. The lighter of the colors have no Jet Black, more Sepia, more Ochre, more Permanent White and less Cyan Blue. More Sepia, Ochre and less Cyan Blue makes for a warmer lighter color. The darker shadow colors are just the opposite. More Cyan Blue, more Jet Black and less Permanent White, Ochre and Sepia. The complete the shadow colors I take a thin liner and add a highlight made up of the color of the sky, a mixture of Cyan Blue and Permanent White. This gives the shadow color a colorful realistic look (see top photo). If an object is not in direct sunlight, the shadow will still have color. It will reflect colors from the sky. Anyone who has taken lots of night photography in the city has knows this. A good digital camera picks up colors that the naked eye doesn’t see. Objects that aren’t in direct light still have lots of color. The colors are just much cooler with lots of blue.

This is where we left off. The two trees to the left and right of the big tree are the ones we will be working on.
This is where we left off. The two trees to the left and right of the big tree are the ones we will be working on.
Here is our glass palette of tree bark colors.
Here is our glass palette of tree bark colors.
Here is the palette of water reflection colors. I will recycle one of the blues for the highlight shadow color.
Here is the palette of water reflection colors. I will recycle one of the blues for the highlight shadow color.
This is one of my thinnest liners. The #1 series 540 Windsor & Newton Regency Gold. I was using this in the top photo.
This is one of my thinnest liners. The #1 series 540 Windsor & Newton Regency Gold. I was using this in the top photo.
This is the painting after working on the shadow side of the trees.
This is the painting after working on the shadow side of the trees.
A detailed closeup of the tree on the left.
A detailed closeup of the tree on the left.
A detailed closeup of the tree on the right.
A detailed closeup of the tree on the right.